Blog posts from October, 2017

Thank a Librarian

October 13, 2017 by Sam Wasylyshyn

During the early 1930s, IBM developed the first modern accounting machine designed for the financial sector. However, the banks weren’t buying the IBM machines; in fact, they were just trying to stay in business, and no one was investing in new equipment. The accounting technology was new, and people didn’t understand its potential yet (thus a reluctance to invest in it). Even with this dismal outlook, IBM found an unexpected solution: libraries. Unlike the banks, libraries during the early days of the New Deal era had money to invest. After the famed New York Public Library bought an accounting machine, others followed suit, leading to more than 100 purchases by libraries across the country. Once the economy regained momentum after World War II, the business community once again had the money to invest and recognized the sheer importance of computing technology. IBM redesigned their machines to help companies complete their payroll, and within a few years, IBM became a leader in the computer industry. Have you ever experienced an unexpected occurrence similar to IBM? Was in how the product was made or how the product was sold to the market? This story covers one source of innovation known as “unexpected

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Reflecting on Resins

October 03, 2017 by John Hattery

The market for plastics and resins continues to be somewhat confusing, operating under very different market conditions as compared to other raw material commodities. Though resin producers have learned the value of managing capacity to stabilize (and potentially to increase margins), the way they’ve been building up inventories is puzzling, even in the face of steady and increasing demand. The fact that producers were pushing for price increases as of August indicates that they anticipate increasing demand, decreasing capacity, or a combination of both, and have some confidence of realizing higher prices for their products. After Hurricane Harvey, demands for increased pricing have only strengthened as stockpiles are drawn down and infrastructure restarts are slower than hoped for. What can you do to keep up with these continually changing trends? Be responsible for your own defense. The best defense for a small manufacturer is to have multiple sources of resin pre-validated in your manufacturing process and pre-approved by your customers. This allows you to seamlessly shift from one supplier to another if faced with an unpalatable pricing demand. Be prepared to play suppliers against each other to ensure they remain in a reasonable margin band as market conditions vary, and

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